MEMPHIS SOUL SURVIVOR DON BRYANTโ€™S NEW ALBUM DONโ€™T GIVE UP ON LOVEย AND HIS ORIGINAL HI RECORDS RELEASE, PRECIOUS SOUL
THATโ€™S RIGHT! TWO RECORDS THIS MONTH!

 

Best known as a staff songwriter under Willie Mitchell at Hi Records and as the husband of Hi star Ann Peebles, Don Bryantย is also a fine, under-appreciated singer in his own right, having penned โ€œI Canโ€™t Stand the Rain,โ€ forย Peebles. Precious Soul is one of our all-time-favorite soul recordsโ€ฆa Memphis classic that deserves a spot next to any of Otis Reddingโ€™s, Al Greenโ€™s, or Arethaโ€™s records.

Weโ€™re excitedย to send our Record of the Month Club members Donโ€™s new record as well as Precious Soul, which was originally released in 1969. The new album drops on May 12th, so weโ€™ll be shipping them out around then. Sign up now for our Record of the Month Club to get in on the action.

From NPR:

More than 40 years after penning his biggest hit, Don Bryant is back in the game. Bryant โ€” who sang in a gospel quartet before linking up with R&B bandleader Willie Mitchell and becoming a go-to songwriter at Memphisโ€™ Hi Records โ€” might be best known for writing the 1973 slow-cooker โ€œI Canโ€™t Stand The Rainโ€ with singer Ann Peebles, whom he married shortly afterward. Now, at 74, heโ€™s preparing to release a new album of original songs, Donโ€™t Give Up On Love.

See a video for the first single off the new record over at NPR.

 

RollingStone recently said of the new album (read the entire feature here):

Peebles came to the studio to provide feedback as her husband worked on the new album. โ€œThat was very uplifting,โ€ he says. โ€œWhatever she offers as far as the songs are concerned, as far as how maybe I could try it this way or that way, I listen. She still has it.โ€

Her advice must have been useful on โ€œIt Was Jealousy,โ€ a glowingly downhearted ballad that Bryant wrote for Peeblesโ€™ 1975 album Tellinโ€™ It. This may be the pinnacle of Donโ€™t Give Up on Love: Bryant demonstrates the full extent of his range, stretching from low, scratchy entreaties to wordless falsetto, as the band articulates delicate, languid soul behind him. โ€œThat one has always been my favorite,โ€ Bryant says. โ€œOtis Clay did it. Ann did it. And now, I have a chance to do it.โ€